New Product Friday ~ Sinu-Care

This is a product I have used for a few years now in the Fall. I use it for itchy, sneezing nose. It is herbal, veggie caps, very mild, but effective.

sinucare
http://www.pennherb.com/cgi-bin/herbstore.cgi/go?;4004

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New Product Friday ~ Neti Mist Sinus Spray

Woohhhhh! I am SUPER excited about this new product from the Himalayan Institute! Can’t wait to get my bottle.

Their blurb:
Neti Mist™ Sinus Spray is a new 100% all-natural spray uniquely formulated with ingredients to help soothe and decongest your sinuses.

Helps relieve:

* sinus congestion & pressure
* cold & allergy symptoms
* stuffy cold symptoms
* thick mucus & phlegm
netimistlrg

https://www.himalayaninstitute.org/store/product/3f2832da-70ed-4474-b884-3e27f7af0501.aspx<a

New Product Friday

Going with the theme of sinus problems, cold, flu and allergies at this time of year….no one should be without this:

Aveda Blue Oil

Click Below to purchase it, or find it at a local shop or salon:

http://www.aveda.com/templates/products2/spp.tmpl?ngextredir=1&CATEGORY_ID=CATEGORY10699&PRODUCT_ID=PROD5911

Aveda’s Blue Oil Balancing Concentrate  is a blend of peppermint and Blue Chamomile.

Apply under nostrils, like Vicks. The rollerball allows you to use it on the back of the neck and shoulders. I rollerball it on my fingers, then put it on my face, just outside the nostrils at the sinus pressure points.  Use it on the temples and jaw, too, to release tension…

(My only word of warning: avoid it too close to the eyes!) The peppermint will get ya! 🙂

Sinusitis

Massage for the sinuses are definitely something to think about if you have sinusitus and/or allergies. Here are a few things that will help:

    1. Sinus Massage: To promote drainage and alleviate congestion, perform a sinus massage.

    2. Acupressure: Utilize the wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) by applying pressure to specific acupoints.

    3. Cranial Sacral Therapy: Because it moves stagnant cerebrospinal fluid within the bones of the skull, cranial sacral techniques create an influx of circulation, which consequently eases sinus pressure. This technique is especially useful for head, jaw, eye and ear pain from chronic sinusitis.

    4. Lymphatic Drainage Massage: Because this manual technique stimulates the movement of lymphatic fluid, it helps the body thin out mucus. Especially when applied to lymph vessels in the head and neck, properly applied lymphatic drainage massage can reduce congestion and sinus pressure.

After any bodywork treatment, drink plenty of extra water to flush out the system. I can do all therapies listed above! See www.carriehura.abmp.com to find me at Salon West.

Adapted from: Four Ways Massage Therapy Helps Sinusitis Sufferers
by Nicole Cutler, L.Ac.
http://www.integrative-healthcare.org/mt/archives/2009/10/four_ways_massa.html

How to Neti

Neti is so great for this time of the year for many reasons: preventing flu/colds, lessening the severity of said colds, and allergies, and cleansing. Some doctors are prescribing a saline wash for people who work in allergy-producing environments. In cold, dry weather, I used to get bloody noses…not any more!

What I hear most often is the fear people have of water in their nose. Believe me, I COMPLETELY understand. I don’t even like to go under water! But, given about a week, you will get used to the gentle feeling, and be clear and breathing more freely.

One contraindication for using a Neti pot is having a deviated septum; the water just won’t go through to the other side. Utilizing a saline wash bottle will be effective.

Steps:
1. Prepare the Neti pot with warm, not hot or cold, water. Add saline pack or measured sea salt.

2. Lean head to side over the sink. Open mouth and begin to breathe in and out through the mouth.

3. Insert tube of Neti pot into the most open nostril, tilt pot and let the water flow. Pour about half of the contents into one side. Turn head opposite, then pour the rest of the water through.

Gently blow nose, clearing it of all water. If your sinuses tend toward dryness, you can oil the nasal passages with a premade oil called nasya.
Try this one from Banyan Botanicals:
http://www.banyanbotanicals.com/prodinfo.asp?number=3181&variation=&aitem=1&mitem=2
If not available, you can use any natural oil like sesame or olive.

How often to Neti:
The yogis suggest once a day in the morning. If your have a cold or allergies, you can do it twice a day or more.

PREVENT THE SPREAD OF THE H1N1 VIRUS (SWINE FLU) and Colds, etc

Dr. Vinay Goyal is an MBBS,DRM,DNB (Intensivist and Thyroid specialist) having clinical experience of over 20 years. He has worked in institutions like Hinduja Hospital , Bombay Hospital , Saifee Hospital , and Tata Memorial. Presently, he is heading the Nuclear Medicine Department and Thyroid clinic at Riddhivinayak Cardiac and Critical Centre, Malad (W).

He offers the following message regarding the prevention of spreading the H1N1 Virus (Swine Flu).

The only portals of entry for this virus are the nostrils and mouth/throat. In a global epidemic of this nature, it’s almost impossible to avoid coming into contact with H1N1 in spite of all precautions. Contact with H1N1 is not so much of a problem as is proliferation.

While you are still healthy and not showing any symptoms of H1N1 infection, in order to prevent proliferation, aggravation of symptoms and development of secondary infections, some very simple steps, not fully highlighted in most official communications, can be practiced (instead of focusing on how to stock N95 or Tamiflu):

1. Frequent hand-washing (well highlighted in all official communications).

2. “Hands-off-the-face” approach. Resist all temptations to touch any part of the face (unless you want to eat, bathe or slap).

3. Gargle twice a day with warm salt water (use Listerine if you don’t trust salt). H1N1 takes 2-3 days after initial infection in the throat/ nasal cavity to proliferate and show characteristic symptoms. Simple gargling prevents proliferation. In a way, gargling with salt water has the same effect on a healthy individual that Tamiflu has on an infected one. Don’t underestimate this simple, inexpensive and powerful preventative method.

4. Similar to 3 above, clean your nostrils at least once every day with warm salt water . Nasal Irrigation (known as Jala Neti in Ayurveda) using a neti pot is best. Oprah and Dr. Oz recommend it! 🙂
If you are unable to use a neti pot, try blowing the nose hard once a day and swabbing both nostrils with cotton swabs dipped in warm salt water. These techniques can be very effective in bringing down viral population.

Neti pots and sinus rinse kits are available at the drug store and relatively inexpensive….under $15.
Carrie adds, “Meijer and Walgreen has a brand called NeilMed NasaFlo that includes premixed packets of saline formula that is really gentle. This neti pot is nice since it is plastic, it’s great for traveling. When I bought mine, it was $13.39”

Luna Jordan would like to add that a drop of oil can be placed in each nostril following nasal irrigation to prevent the nasal membranes from drying out (especially in dry climates). Dr. Vasant Lad says to “Dip the clean little finger into the appropriate oil and insert into each nostril as deeply as possible.” Make sure your fingernails are trimmed. As long as the sinuses are not overly congested, brahmi oil (which is made from gotu kola or bacopa in a sesame oil base or ghee can be used.)

5. Boost your natural immunity with foods that are rich in Vitamin C (such as citrus and broccoli). If you have to supplement with Vitamin C tablets, make sure that it also has Zinc to boost absorption.

6. Drink as much of warm liquids (tea, coffee, etc) as you can. Drinking warm liquids has the same effect as gargling, but in the reverse direction. They wash off proliferating viruses from the throat into the stomach where they cannot survive, proliferate or do any harm.

Here are a few more suggestions from yoga therapy for the prevention of H1N1:

7. Keep warm with warm clothes and warm food, and if possible even the air you breathe should be warm. The virus does not proliferate as well in heat as it does in cold.

8. Be sure to get plenty of rest.

9. One more suggestion for yoga practitioners in particular, if you practice pranayama (breathwork), you should not breathe as deeply, especially if you begin to show any symptoms. Also avoid Bhastrika (Bellows Breath).

STAY HEALTHY THIS WINTER!

neticleanse01

Thanks to my friend Luna Jordan for posting:
http://www.santafeyogatherapy.com/index.php

If you need help with the Neti Pot, please contact Carrie, she does this….even in public! 🙂